Skip to main content

About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
CSPAN2 27
CSPAN 21
FBC 9
CNBC 7
CNN 6
CNNW 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
KCSM (PBS) 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
WETA 4
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 120
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)
., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 170 and the nays are mented mouse is -- the motion is not adopted. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the gentleman from maryland. mr. van hollen: i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. this will be a five-minute vote. a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 223 and the nays a
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. since our founding, the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others. but there is absolutely no justification to this type of senseless violence. none. >> not content to sit on the sidelines at a critical moment in his presidential campaign, governor mitt romney plunged himself into the middle of this developing crisis, sharply criticizing the president by a written statement last night and doubling down on that criticism this morning. >> when our grounds are being attacked and being breached, that the first response of the united states must be outrage at the breach of the sovereignty of our nation. and apology for america's values is never the right course. the president and his administration have done something which is inconsistent with the principles of america. >> team romney has thus far focused its misleading attacks on a statement made by the u.s. embassy in cairo before any attacks began. it was a preemptive stat
leaders are leading the reform process. united states is committed to protecting the space for civil society to operate and the critical role plays in transitioning democracy all over the world. with a greater emphasis on a broader range of u.s. power, president obama succeeded in laying a new foundation for leadership in the world. nowhere do you see this more clearly than the commitment to the area that you focus on for the remainder of my remarks, the development in poverty and prosperity. the presiden was unapologetic, putting to rest the old myth that development is near charity. rejecting the notion that they were condemned by the gains in human developments. as such, the national security strategy recognizes development in the moral, strategic, and economic imperatives. on that day he announced the new u.s. global development policy. the premise is on the conviction that the ultimate goal of foreign assistance and development is to create the conditions with the assistance are no longer needed. focusing on helping these broad base -- is broadbased economic growth, prioritizing
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
that it is going as you will understand the united states we understand of madison and jefferson and washington how they form the country but would be a very good basis for understanding what was going on in the united states so current china was very much shaped by deng xiaoping. he came to power in 1978 and was the dominant person right up until 1992 for the period of about 14 years. what i thought i would do in the brief time today i was told to not talk for more than 20 minutes would be to talk about some of the forces that shaped what he was and what he did to transform china because 1978 the country that he inherited had a per capita income of less than $100 per capita. now is estimated somewhere rs/6000 and it's on the path of that he is headed on. there is almost no migration from the countryside in the city and since he came perhaps 200 million have moved from the countryside to the town and the city. when he came to power the country was still involved in the cultural revolution and the relevant nettie toward each other and he worked to unite the country to set it on the new path. what ar
way? what constitutes the wrong way? here in united states and in the middle east there is enormous debate over how to handle iran's pursuit of a nuclear enrichment capability, a capability which would give iran the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons if they chose to do so. and obvious a this is an issue that's been with us for a very long time. i remember i first encountered it in immediate aftermath of the gulf war in 1991 when israel purchased 25 longer-range f-15 e. strike fighters. and those fighters were designated not f-15 e., but f-15-i. and the manufacture said that the i was for israel. if you spoke to israeli air force pilots and commanders, what the uniform would say to you is now now now that i is for iraq. this is an issue, this is a problem, it is a threat that the israelis have been thinking about for a very long time. they has been a great deal of effort trying to figure out how to develop a military option to disarm iran, to destroy its nuclear program if they ever chose to do so. and they've been working very deciduous lead at the. but by the same token, you w
>>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a smart show for you today. we'll talk mostly about what else has been going on in the world outside of the democratic national convention. >>> things have heated up with regard to iran and israel, with syria, with afghanistan. i've got a great panel to discuss all of it. anne-marie slaughter, richard haass, martin indyk. >>> then, a different spin on a familiar question in the presidential campaign. will americans be better off four years from now? one of the world's top bankers, roger altman, thinks so. harvard's niall ferguson isn't so sure. >>> next up, can't we just predict the election results now and be done with it? i'll ask nate silver, "the new york times'" brilliant statistician. >>> also, the crisis you don't know enough about that could have a big impact around the globe. >>> first, here's my take. both conventions are done, and what can we say about the upcoming campaign and election? well, one hearty prediction about ele
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
, but that is critical cause more trouble than any of the problem we've got fiscally in the united states. getting medicare costs under control is the number-one thing. >> you say we also surcharged smokers and the obese for their medicare coverage. where did that idea come from? >> i am the person that put it in the memo but i didn't have to fight very hard for it. also, i ran into this, something i ran in "the washington post" install of calling people morbidly obese i called them mega fatties and i was refuted by "the washington post" for being insensitive, which i guess i probably am. this is another thing where everybody knows this to be true and someone has to pay for it. there should be penalties. i'm not really a democrat but i'm certainly democrat compared to him. you have to be responsible to some extent for your personal behavior. someone is going to pay for it. >> quite right. we should point out also we are not only ones making arguments like this. there are other bipartisan commissions and so forth. the task force that was headed by a was rivlin and pete domenici, a democrat and repu
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
for the viewrs of others. and he disassociated the united states from the hateful video that was made in california that derotted the prophet mohammed and islam. and the president said this is his main point, he was passionate about it. the americans have an abiding belief in made a compelling case mr.. he also had a message for iran and that is that while we want to negotiate our differences through diplomacy if that's possible, that time is not unlimited. i thought it was a warning to the iranian government is a difficult deal with. i thought it was a important speech that the president gave yesterday in my. >> >> host: how about mitt romney can, you assess from what yoaf heard and have seen over the months. is there anything close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for r
, in a sense, talking about, like, the 99%. think of, you know, some of the demonstrators m united states or in europe who have also said that the system is rigged against them. there might be some resonance. >> the american delegation, they walk out. clearly, that was not unexpected, but you did have some real power players who are sitting there. he does have a world audience, a wobbled stage. you've got russia wra. you have iran. china. the u.k. many of these other very powerful players here. how do they respond to them him? >> you know, if you look at russia and china, they believe that each country should be loued to do what it wants, and if they want to talk, let them talk. although russia does support the let's say movement to try to limit iran's ability to develop a nuclear bomb, and that would put them on the side of the united states. when it comes to kind of let them talk, they would sit there and listen to it. the united states decided not to even walk out. they didn't even walk in. they issued a statement. maybe we can read that statement if we have it. yes. coming from the sp
and egypt follow tuesday night's storming of the united states consulate in the libyan city of benghazi. the u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other staff members were killed in the attack. stevens is the first u.s. ambassador to be killed on duty since 1979. on wednesday, president obama vowed to bring to justice those responsible for the deaths in libya. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we are working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats and have directed my administration to increase security at posts around the world. make no mistake, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attack our people. >> the obama administration has dispatched an elite group of marines to the libyan capital of tripoli. in addition, two u.s. warships are reportedly headed towards the libyan coast and the u.s. has redeployed surveillance drones over libya. protests against them have also occurred in iraq, iran, tunisia, and bangladesh. >> at the center of the controversy is an online trailer
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] >> find in the speech from both the democratic and republican conventions on line at the c-span video library. book tv coverage from the 2012 rose above reading festival continues. mary stuck the talks about her book, the finding americans, the presidency in national identity. >> now i have to try to be engaging. i think the most important thing to understand about the presidency in this context is that we always have choices. when you pick a president you are absolutely picking a particular kind of policy, but you're also picking a definition of our national identity -- identity. if you hear president and you like what they're saying to make you feel yourself call to the presidency than they are speaking to you about a sense of the national self that is deeply imbedded in all of us, and every time there's a presidential alexian will one of our previous presidents learned to his sorrow has the vision thing is really an important part of what the presidency does because we see ourselves as a nation through the ways that presidents
just search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on today's show we'll bring you some of the best interviews of the year. first up, the most powerful man in america. no, not what you're thinking. that's what some people call grover ronquist. who? he is behind the gop pledge never to raise taxes. then, who really creates jobs in this country? is it the 1% or the 99%? i'll talk to two 1%-ers who vehemently disagree. >>> next up, the politics of outer space. america won the race to the moon, but that was 40 years ago. the u.s. is essentially sitting on the bench in the current space race. will that hurt it back here on earth? >>> also, the world's great historian of the middle east, bernard lewis, on the past and future on that part of the world. >>> but first, here's my take. so i thought i would take a step away from politics, the conventions and the campaigns and look around the world. you know,
that open new plants and train new workers right here in the united states of america we can reward those companies that build right here and double their exports. we can create 1 million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years. you can make that happen. >> i want to create a future where everyone who wants a job can find a job. where no senior figures for their security of their retirement and every parent knows that their child will get an education that leads to a good job and a bright horizon. and unlike the president, i have a plan to create 12 million new jobs. host: has either campaign in specific on how they plan to create 1 million new jobs? politics is not my area, but from what i have followed i have not seen at all specifically this is going to happen. its romney's plan, one of five. is to reduce the deficit. but it is not clear how it leads to more jobs in a direct way. obviously, overall, a strong quake -- stronger economy and reduced debt leads to a better economic environment. but as you cut contractors, teachers, whatever -- anytime government is cutting spending, c
. that is greater than all android phones combined in the united states. with that kind of intent to buy it, we will see a large market. david: they're going to be selling $99. of course that is the older version. the cheaper price also comes with less connections in the iphone 5 does. there'does the 1.2 gigabytes peh compared to those with slower connection. >> apple is covering all the price points. that is a keeping time to address a large body of consumers. you will have the iphone for which is a great phone given away for free on contract. i think they're doing a great job of going up against the competition and frankly at this point over 50% of americans already have smart phones, so getting into mainstream, mom and pop buying smart phones and it has to be really easy to use and apple has set the gold standard. david: what about the corporate market, lot of corporations going for the blackberry. is this going to tap into that market? >> the iphone has been adopted by companies a lot of the fortune 500 are already using iphones. that sai set in a couple of weee will have blackberry jam whe
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
trying to find solutions to the problems of the united states of america. if he loves the united states of america, he should be out on his hinny getting this stuff done instead of talking all over this television and running romney down. host: thanks for the call from dayton, tennessee. want to give you one more story on the day, this from "the washington post," for politicians privacy vanishes in the age of video technology. mitt romney's mistake in speaking bluntly at a may fundraiser was not only in the words he spoke but failing to anticipate the ears they might breach, and audience that looked like an exclusive group of republican donors this week multiflied thanks to the pervasiveness of video technology. they are already confiscating smart phones but they have been largely overmatched as time and again moments intended to be kept secret have turned up on the internet. there is a total collapse of the notion of private space that the republican strategist, and top advisor of senator john mccain's presidential campaign in 2008, increasingly, politicians who say one thing behind cl
in and see him. him is the president of the united states. he's very much a junior partner. that is the new vice presidency. and that's what's really changed. it began under mondale and was that way to our country -- well, it wasn't so useful under cheney but i think now the vice president is a junior partner. he's explained to barack obama. looking up to him as a smarter guy, perhaps a tougher guy. but certainly with great loyalty. >> ed shultz, we're leading up to the president's speech. what are your impressions there? >> he was trying really hard tonight. he was trying to get as emotionally connected to the audience as he possibly could. it wasn't his smoothest performance, but it was effective. you could tell the crowd was involved. they know this man. they know what he's about. he's a genuine guy. high on sincerity, believable. i thought it was good testimony to the president. >> chris? >> i don't think we've seen that pitch of the president so far. the idea that it's about his judgment and what's in his gut and this kind of undescribable part of his being that can make the right call
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
exported from here to ten countries in the asia-pacific region, including japan, the united states, and singapore. there are large oil deposits in eastern siberia. most of the crude oil exported originates in this area. during the soviet era, the oil fields of western siberia were the center of oil production. however, after nearly 40 years of productivity, they will soon be depleted. to take their place, production has been stepped up in eastern siberia. one of the oil fields now being developed by russian oil companies is this oil field, the size of switzerland. it was first discovered during the soviet era. at that time, there was no way to transport the oil, so it was left untouched for nearly 50 years. >> translator: currently, we have five tanks with the capacity of 3,000 cubic meters. one for processing, four for storage. construction recently began for two tanks of 10,000 cubic meters. >> reporter: for decades, the population of the local village has been falling. there were no jobs. the oil field development prompted the population boom. it's also brought new infrastructur
, including japan, the united states and singapore. there are large oil deposits. most of the crude exported from the terminal originates in this area. during the soviet era, the oil fields of western siberia were the center of russia's oil production. however, after nearly 40 years of productivity, they will soon be depleted. to take their place, production has been stepped up in eastern siberia. one of the oil fields now being developed by russian oil company s is the size of switzerland. it was first discovered during the soviet era. at that time, there was no way to transport the oil, so it was left untouched for nearly 50 years. >> translator: currently, we have five tanks with a capacity of 3,000 cubic meters. one for processing and four for storage. and construction recently began for two tanks of 10,000 cubic meters. >> reporter: for decades, the population of the local village has been falling. there were no jobs. the oil field development prompted the population boom. it's also brought new infrastructure to the village. >> translator: the number of children has increased, and there
. it was in the united states and we are talking about a place where it is not safe to send an f.b.i. agent. why the f.b.i.? because they do the best forensics. they are best at figuring this stuff out. it is our intelligence and others that put more fact on top of that letting us get to the bottom of this. this is benghazi. you do not just go wandering in with 15 or 20 f.b.i. agent. >>neil: something collapsed but we will find out. you are right, joe. very go to see you. >> i think i know why this guy had to draw pictures for the united nations. a lot them are pretty stupid at the united nations. they can tax your patience especially when they tax your wallet. are you ready ? share everything by turning your smartphone into a mobile hotspot for up to 8 wifi-enabled devices at no extra charge. like the new droid razr m by motorola only $99.99. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b med
will look at its importance in the region and its relationship with the united states. "this is america" visits the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. this year, kazakhstan celebrates its 20th anniversary of independence. on this program, we will learn about what it was like before independence 20 years ago, and how oil and a visionary president made kazakhstan the success it is today and why diversifying its economy will be the key to kazakhstan's even brighter future. >> it was a while the economy, while business economy, and a great economy mainly. today, we have a lot of public companies. our businessmen are doing international joint ventures. if you take the society as a whole, are people became much more open-minded, a free, outspoken people, and we are much different from what we were before. >> has that been exciting to be a
, arms, and legs. >> what they said in the united states 20 years earlier. jazz, people don't know this, first inception in the 1920s was attacked roundly as primitive jungle music bringing down american youth. stalin and eastern europe said exactly the same things with the same words later on. stossel: rock n roll then came. >> more popular than jazz. millions of fans across eastern europe. by 1980s disco and rock in the 1980s were enormously popular throughout the communism world. stossel: relaxed the rules because they were losing. >> it was too late. then if he continues to repress this energy, this desire for freedom and pleasure, he'd lose. he let it go. western acts came in, and it took off from there. stossel: left the acts in, surprising. bruce springsteen drew a huge crowd in east germany. we have a clip of him singing "born in the usa." ♪ born in the usa stossel: in east germany, this is remarkable because so many people were there singing along to "born in the usa," and they were not allowed in the usa. >> that's right. great evidence this is enormous popularity signaling
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)